Sunday, December 4, 2022, 12:05 AM
Site: Dearborn Educational Curriculum
Course: Dearborn Educational Curriculum (DEC)
Glossary: Social Studies Standards
1

1-C1.0.1

Explain the need for rules and purposes of rules.

1-C1.0.2

Give examples of the use of power with authority and power without authority in school.

1-C2.0.1

Explain fair ways to make decisions and resolve conflicts in the school community.

1-C2.0.2

Identify important symbols of the United States of America and what they represent.

1-C5.0.1

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school.

1-C5.0.2

Explain important rights and how, when, and where members of American society demonstrate their responsibilities by actively participating in civic life.

1-E1.0.1

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

1-E1.0.2

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

1-E1.0.3

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

1-E1.0.4

Describe reasons why people voluntarily trade.

1-E1.0.5

Describe ways in which people earn money.

1-E1.0.6

Describe how money simplifies trade.

1-G1.0.1

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

1-G1.0.2

Describe places using absolute location or relative location.

1-G1.0.3

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

1-G2.0.1

Distinguish between physical and human characteristics of places.

1-G2.0.2

Describe the unifying characteristics and boundaries of different school regions.

1-G4.0.1

Use components of culture to describe diversity in family life.

1-G5.0.1

Describe ways in which people are part of, modify, and adapt to their physical environments.

1-G5.0.2

Describe ways in which the physical environment in a place or region affects people's lives.

1-H2.0.1

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

1-H2.0.2

Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identifying various members and their connections in order to tell a narrative about family life.

1-H2.0.3

Use historical sources to draw possible conclusions about family or school life in the past.

1-H2.0.4

Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication.

1-H2.0.5

Identify the events or people celebrated during U.S. national holidays and why we celebrate them.

1-P3.1.1

Identify public issues in the school community.

1-P3.1.2

Use graphic data to analyze information about a public issue in the school community.

1-P3.1.3

Identify alternative resolutions to a public issue in the school community.

1-P3.3.1

Express a position on a public policy issue in the school community and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

1-P4.2.1

Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a school issue.

1-P4.2.2

Participate in projects to help or inform others.
2

2-C1.0.1

Explain why people form governments.

2-C1.0.2

Distinguish between government action and private action.

2-C2.0.1

Explain how local governments balance individual rights with the common good to solve local community problems.

2-C2.0.2

Describe how the Pledge of Allegiance reflects the Democratic Value of patriotism.

2-C3.0.1

Give examples of how local governments make, enforce, and interpret laws (ordinances) in the local community.

2-C3.0.2

Use examples to describe how local government affects the lives of people in a community.

2-C3.0.3

Identify services commonly provided by local governments.

2-C5.0.1

Identify ways in which people participate in community decisions.

2-C5.0.2

Distinguish between personal and civic responsibilities and explain why they are important in community life.

2-C5.0.3

Design and participate in community improvement projects that help or inform others.

2-E1.0.1

Identify the opportunity cost involved in a consumer decision.

2-E1.0.2

Describe how businesses in the local community meet economic wants of consumers.

2-E1.0.3

Describe the natural, human, and capital resources needed for production of a good or service in the community.

2-E1.0.4

Use examples to show that people cannot produce everything they want (specialization) and depend on trade with others to meet their wants (interdependence).

2-E1.0.5

Utilize a decision-making process to analyze the benefits and costs of a personal decision.

2-G1.0.1

Construct maps of the local community that contain symbols, labels, and legends denoting human and physical characteristics of place.

2-G1.0.2

Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying concepts including relative location, and using distance, direction, and scale.

2-G1.0.3

Use maps to describe the location of the local community within the state of Michigan in relation to other significant places in the state.

2-G2.0.1

Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

2-G2.0.2

Describe how the local community is part of a larger region.

2-G4.0.1

Describe land use in the community.

2-G4.0.2

Describe the means people create for moving people, goods, and ideas within the local community.

2-G4.0.3

Use components of culture to describe diversity in the local community.

2-G5.0.1

Suggest ways in which people can responsibly interact with the environment in the local community.

2-G5.0.2

Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

2-H2.0.1

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among years and decades using a timeline of local community events.

2-H2.0.2

Examine different perspectives of the same event in a community and explain how and why they are different.

2-H2.0.3

Explain how individuals and groups have made significant historical changes.

2-H2.0.4

Describe changes in the local community over time.

2-H2.0.5

Describe how community members responded to a problem in the past.

2-H2.0.6

Construct a historical narrative about the history of the local community from a variety of sources.

2-P3.1.1

Identify public issues in the local community that influence people’s daily lives.

2-P3.1.2

Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in the local community and evaluate alternative resolutions.

2-P3.1.3

Give examples of how conflicts over Democratic Values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in the local community.

2-P3.3.1

Compose a statement expressing a position on a public policy issue in the local community and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

2-P4.2.1

Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a community issue.

2-P4.2.2

Participate in projects to help or inform others.
3

3-C1.0.1

Give an example of how Michigan state government fulfills one of the purposes of government.

3-C2.0.1

Describe how the Michigan state government reflects the principle of representative government.

3-C3.0.1

Distinguish between the roles of tribal, state, and local governments.

3-C3.0.2

Identify goods and services provided by the state government and describe how they are funded.

3-C3.0.3

Identify the three branches of state government in Michigan and the powers of each.

3-C3.0.4

Explain how state courts function to resolve conflict.

3-C3.0.5

Describe the purpose of the Michigan Constitution.

3-C5.0.1

Identify and explain rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

3-E1.0.1

Using a Michigan example, explain how scarcity, choice, and opportunity cost affect what is produced and consumed.

3-E1.0.2

Identify incentives that influence economic decisions people make in Michigan.

3-E1.0.3

Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic development.

3-E1.0.4

Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services in Michigan.

3-E1.0.5

Explain the role of entrepreneurship and business development in Michigan's economic future.

3-E2.0.1

Using a Michigan example, explain how specialization leads to increased interdependence.

3-E3.0.1

Identify products produced in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.

3-G1.0.1

Use cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to describe the relative locations of significant places in the immediate environment.

3-G1.0.2

Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human characteristics of Michigan.

3-G1.0.3

Use a world map to describe North America in relation to the equator and other continents and oceans, and Michigan within North America.

3-G2.0.1

Use a variety of visual materials and data sources to describe ways in which Michigan can be divided into regions.

3-G2.0.2

Describe different regions to which Michigan belongs.

3-G4.0.1

Describe major kinds of economic activity in Michigan today, such as agriculture, forestry, manufacturing, services and tourism, and research and development, and explain the factors influencing the location of these economic activities.

3-G4.0.2

Describe diverse groups that have migrated into a region of Michigan and reasons why they came (push/pull factors).

3-G4.0.3

Describe some of the current movements of goods, people, jobs, or information to, from, or within Michigan and explain reasons for the movements.

3-G4.0.4

Use data and current information about the Anishinaabek and other Indigenous Peoples living in Michigan today to describe the cultural aspects of modern life.

3-G5.0.1

Describe how people are a part of, adapt to, use, and modify the physical environment of Michigan.

3-G5.0.2

Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.

3-H3.0.1

Identify questions historians ask in examining the past in Michigan.

3-H3.0.10

Create a timeline to sequence and describe major eras and events in early Michigan history.

3-H3.0.2

Explain how historians use primary and secondary sources to answer questions about the past.

3-H3.0.3

Describe the casual relationships between three events in Michigan's past.

3-H3.0.4

Draw upon traditional stories and/or teachings of Indigenous Peoples who lived and continue to live in Michigan in order to better understand their beliefs and histories.

3-H3.0.5

Use informational text and visual data to compare how Indigenous Peoples and non-Indigenous Peoples in the early history of Michigan interacted with, adapted to, used, and/or modified their environments.

3-H3.0.6

Use a variety of sources to describe interactions that occurred between Indigenous Peoples and the first European explorers and settlers in Michigan.

3-H3.0.7

Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about daily life in the early settlements of Michigan (pre-statehood).

3-H3.0.8

Use case studies or stories to describe how the ideas or actions of individuals affected the history of Michigan (pre-statehood).

3-H3.0.9

Describe how Michigan attained statehood.

3-P3.1.1

Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

3-P3.1.2

Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.

3-P3.1.3

Give examples of how conflicts over Democratic Values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

3-P3.3.1

Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

3-P4.2.1

Develop and implement an action plan and know how, when, and where to address or inform others about a public issue.

3-P4.2.2

Participate in projects to help or inform others.
4

4-C1.0.1

Identify questions political scientists ask in examining the United States.

4-C1.0.2

Describe the purposes of government as identified in the Preamble of the Constitution.

4-C2.0.1

Explain how the principles of popular sovereignty, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, and individual rights serve to limit the powers of the federal government as reflected in the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

4-C2.0.2

Describe how rights guaranteed by the Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and Democratic Values are involved in everyday situations.

4-C3.0.1

Give examples of ways the Constitution limits the powers of the federal government.

4-C3.0.2

Give examples of powers exercised by the federal government, tribal governments and state governments.

4-C3.0.3

Describe the organizational structure of the federal government in the United States (legislative, executive, and judicial branches).

4-C3.0.4

Describe how the powers of the federal government are separated among the branches.

4-C3.0.5

Give examples of how the system of checks and balances limits the power of the federal government.

4-C3.0.6

Describe how the President, members of the Congress, Supreme Court Justices are elected or appointed.

4-C3.0.7

Explain how the federal government uses taxes and spending to serve the purposes of the government.

4-C5.0.1

Explain the responsibilities of members of American society.

4-C5.0.2

Explain rights of citizenship, why rights have limits, and the relationships between rights and responsibilities.

4-C5.0.3

Describe ways in which people can work together to promote the values and principles of American democracy.

4-E1.0.1

Identify a good or service produced in the United States and apply the three economic questions all economies must address.

4-E1.0.2

Describe characteristics of a market economy.

4-E1.0.3

Describe how positive and negative incentives influence behavior in a market economy.

4-E1.0.4

Explain how price affects decisions about purchasing goods and services.

4-E1.0.5

Explain how specialization and division of labor increase productivity.

4-E1.0.6

Explain how competition among buyers results in higher prices, and competition among sellers results in lower prices.

4-E1.0.7

Describe the role of money in the exchange of goods and services.

4-E1.0.8

List goods and services governments provide in a market economy and explain how these goods and services are funded.

4-E2.0.1

Explain how changes in the United States economy impact levels of employment and unemployment.

4-E3.0.1

Identify advantages and disadvantages of global competition.

4-G1.0.1

Identify questions geographers ask in examining the United States.

4-G1.0.2

Identify and describe the characteristics and purposes of a variety of technological geographic tools.

4-G1.0.3

Use geographic tools and technologies, stories, songs, and pictures to answer geographic questions about the United States.

4-G1.0.4

Use maps to describe elevation, climate, and patterns of population density in the United States.

4-G1.0.5

Use hemispheres, continents, oceans, and major lines of latitude to describe the relative location of the United States on a world map.

4-G2.0.1

Describe ways in which the United States can be divided into different regions.

4-G2.0.2

Locate and describe human and physical characteristics of major U.S. regions and compare them to the Great Lakes region.

4-G4.0.1

Use a case study or story about migration within or to the United States to identify push and pull factors (why they left, why they came) that influenced the migration.

4-G4.0.2

Describe the impact of immigration to the United States on the cultural development of different places or regions of the United States.

4-G4.0.3

Describe some of the movements of resources, goods, people, and information to, from, or within the United States, and explain the reasons for the movements.

4-G5.0.1

Assess the positive and negative consequences of human activities on the physical environment of the United States and identify the causes of those activities.

4-H3.0.1

Use historical inquiry questions to investigate the development of Michigan's major economic activities from statehood to present.

4-H3.0.2

Use primary and secondary sources to explain how migration and immigration affected and continue to affect the growth of Michigan.

4-H3.0.3

Use case studies or stories to describe the ideas and actions of individuals involved in the Underground Railroad in Michigan and in the Great Lakes region.

4-H3.0.4

Describe how the relationship between the location of natural resources and the location of industries (after 1837) affected and continue to affect the location and growth of Michigan cities.

4-H3.0.5

Use visual data and informational text or primary accounts to compare a major Michigan economic activity today with that same activity or a related activity in the past.

4-H3.0.6

Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor movement in Michigan.

4-H3.0.7

Describe past and current threats to Michigan’s natural resources and describe how state government, tribal and local governments, schools, organizations, and individuals worked in the past and continue to work today to protect its natural resources.

4-P3.1.1

Identify public issues in the United States that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

4-P3.1.1a

Compose a brief essay expressing a position on a public policy issue in the United States and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

4-P3.1.2

Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in the United States and evaluate alternative resolutions.

4-P3.1.3

Give examples of how conflicts over Democratic Values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in the United States.

4-P4.2.1

Develop and implement an action plan and know how, when, and where to address or inform others about a public issue.

4-P4.2.2

Participate in projects to help or inform others.
5

5-P3.1.1

Identify contemporary public issues related to the U.S. Constitution and their related factual, definitional, and ethical questions.

5-P3.1.2

Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a contemporary public issue related to the U.S. Constitution and evaluate alternative resolutions.

5-P3.1.3

Give examples of how conflicts over Democratic Values lead people to differ on contemporary Constitutional issues in the United States.

5-P3.3.1

Compose a short essay expressing a position on a contemporary public-policy issue related to the Constitution and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

5-P4.2.1

Develop and implement an action plan and know how, when, and where to address or inform others about a public issue.

5-P4.2.2

Participate in projects to help or inform others.

5-U1.1.1

Use maps to locate peoples in the Eastern Woodland (the Woodland Peoples east of the Mississippi River), desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, and the nomadic nations of the Great Plains.

5-U1.1.2

Compare how Indigenous Peoples in the Eastern Woodland and another tribal region adapted to or modified the environment.

5-U1.1.3

Describe Eastern Woodland life with respect to governmental and family structures, trade, and their relationship to the land.

5-U1.2.1

Explain the technological and political developments that made sea exploration possible.

5-U1.2.2

Use case studies of individual explorers and stories of life in Europe to compare the goals, obstacles, motivations, and consequences for European exploration and colonization of the Americas.

5-U1.3.1

Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (North Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa).

5-U1.3.2

Describe the life and cultural development of people living in West Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

5-U1.4.1

Describe the convergence of Europeans, Indigenous Peoples, and Africans in the Americas after 1492 from the perspective of these three groups.

5-U1.4.2

Use primary and secondary sources to compare Europeans, Africans, and Indigenous Peoples who converged in the Western Hemisphere after 1492 with respect to governmental structure, and views on property ownership and land use.

5-U1.4.3

Explain the cultural impact that occurred between the British, French, and Spanish on the lives of Indigenous Peoples.

5-U1.4.4

Describe the Columbian Exchange and its impact on Europeans, Indigenous Peoples, and Africans.

5-U2.1.1

"Describe significant developments in the Southern colonies, including: • patterns of settlement and control, including the impact of geography (landforms

5-U2.1.2

"Describe significant developments in the New England colonies,

5-U2.1.3

"Describe significant developments in the Middle colonies, including:

5-U2.1.4

Compare the regional settlement patterns of the Southern colonies, New England, and the Middle colonies.

5-U2.1.5

Explain the economic, political, cultural, and religious causes of migration to colonial North America.

5-U2.2.1

"Describe Triangular Trade, including:

  • the trade routes.
  • the people and goods that were traded.
  • the Middle Passage.
  • the impact on life in Africa. 

5-U2.2.2

Describe the lives of enslaved Africans and free Africans, including fugitive and escaped slaves in the American colonies.

5-U2.2.3

Describe how enslaved and free Africans struggled to retain elements of their diverse African histories and cultures to develop distinct African-American identities.

5-U2.3.1

Locate the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies on a map.

5-U2.3.2

Describe the daily lives of people living in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.

5-U2.3.3

Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of at least three different groups of people.

5-U2.3.4

Describe the development of the emerging labor force in the colonies.

5-U2.3.5

Make generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

5-U3.1.1

Describe how the French and Indian War affected British policy toward the colonies and subsequent colonial dissatisfaction with the new policy.

5-U3.1.2

Describe the causes and effects of events such as the Stamp Act, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, and the Intolerable Acts.

5-U3.1.3

Using an event from the Revolutionary era, explain how British and colonial views on authority and the use of power without authority differed (views on representative government).

5-U3.1.4

Describe the role of the First and Second Continental Congresses in unifying the colonies.

5-U3.1.5

Use the Declaration of Independence to explain why many colonists wanted to separate from Great Britain and why they believed they had the right to do so.

5-U3.1.6

Identify the role that key individuals played in leading the colonists to revolution, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and Thomas Paine.

5-U3.1.7

Describe how colonial experiences with self-government and ideas about government influenced the decision to declare independence.

5-U3.1.8

Identify a problem that people in the colonies faced, identify alternative choices for addressing the problem with possible consequences, and describe the course of action taken.

5-U3.2.1

Describe the advantages and disadvantages each side had during the American Revolution with respect to military leadership, geography, types of resources, and motivations.

5-U3.2.2

Describe the importance of Valley Forge, the Battle of Saratoga, and the Battle of Yorktown in the American Revolution.

5-U3.2.3

Investigate the role of women, enslaved and freed Africans, Indigenous Peoples, and France in helping shape the outcome of the war.

5-U3.2.4

Describe the significance of the Treaty of Paris (establishment of the United States and its initial boundaries).

5-U3.3.1

Describe the powers of the national government and state governments under the Articles of Confederation.

5-U3.3.2

Give examples of problems the country faced under the Articles of Confederation.

5-U3.3.3

Explain why the Constitutional Convention was convened and why the Constitution was written.

5-U3.3.4

Describe the issues over representation and slavery the Framers faced at the Constitutional Convention and how they were addressed in the Constitution.

5-U3.3.5

Give reasons why the Framers wanted to limit the power of government.

5-U3.3.6

Describe the principle of federalism and how it is expressed through the sharing and distribution of power as stated in the Constitution.

5-U3.3.7

Describe the concern that some people had about individual rights and why the inclusion of a Bill of Rights was needed for ratification.

5-U3.3.8

Describe the rights of individuals protected in the Bill of Rights (the first 10 amendments) to the U.S. Constitution.
6

6-C1.1.1

Compare and contrast different ideas about the purposes of government in different nations, nation-states or governments.

6-C3.6.1

Define the characteristics of modern nation-states.

6-C3.6.2

Compare and contrast various forms of government around the world.

6-C4.3.1

Explain how governments address national and international issues and form policies, and how the policies may not be consistent with those of other nation-states.

6-C4.3.2

Explain the challenges to governments to address global issues, and the international cooperation needed to do so.

6-C4.3.3

Analyze the impact of treaties, agreements, and international organizations on global issues.

6-E1.1.1

Explain how incentives and disincentives in the market economy can change the decision-making process.

6-E2.3.1

Analyze the impact of sanctions, tariffs, treaties, quotas, and subsidies.

6-E3.1.1

Explain and compare how economic systems (traditional, command, market) answer the three basic economic questions: What goods and services will be produced? How will they be produced? For whom will they be produced? Also, who will receive the benefits or bears the costs of production?

6-E3.1.2

Compare and contrast the economic and ecological costs and benefits of different kinds of energy production. Examples may include but are

6-E3.3.1

Use charts and graphs to compare imports and exports of different countries in the world and propose generalizations about patterns of economic interdependence.

6-E3.3.2

Diagram or map the flow of materials, labor, and capital used to produce a consumer product.

6-E3.3.3

Explain how communication innovations have affected economic interactions and where and how people work.

6-G1.1.1

Use a variety of geographic tools (maps, globes, and web-based geography technology) to analyze the world at global, regional, and local scales.

6-G1.1.2

Draw a sketch map, or add information to an outline map, of the world or a world region.

6-G1.2.1

Apply the skills of geographic inquiry (asking geographic questions, acquiring geographic information, organizing geographic information, analyzing geographic information, and answering geographic questions) to analyze a geographic problem or issue.

6-G1.2.2

Explain why maps of the same place may vary, including the perspectives and purposes of the cartographers.

6-G1.2.3

Use, interpret, and create maps and graphs representing population characteristics, natural features, and land use of the region under study.

6-G1.2.4

Use images as the basis for answering geographic questions about the human and physical characteristics of places and major world regions.

6-G1.2.5

Locate and use information from GIS and satellite remote sensing to answer geographic questions.

6-G1.2.6

Create or interpret a map of the population distribution of a region and generalize about the factors influencing the distribution of the population.

6-G1.3.1

Use the fundamental themes of geography (location, place, human-environment interaction, movement, region) to describe regions or places on earth.

6-G1.3.2

Explain the different ways in which places are connected and how those connections demonstrate interdependence and accessibility.

6-G2.1.1

Locate and describe the basic patterns of landforms.

6-G2.1.2

Locate and describe the basic patterns and processes of plate tectonics.

6-G2.1.3

Locate and describe the characteristics and patterns of major world climates and ecosystems.

6-G2.2.1

Describe the human characteristics of the region under study, including languages, religions, economic system, governmental system, cultural traditions.

6-G2.2.2

Explain how communities are affected positively or negatively by changes in technology.

6-G2.2.3

Explain how culture and experience influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

6-G2.2.4

Interpret population pyramids from different countries including birth rates, death rates, male-female differences, and the causes and consequences of the age structure of the population.

6-G2.2.5

Generalize about how human and natural factors have influenced how people make a living and perform other activities in a place.

6-G3.1.1

Interpret and compare climographs from different latitudes and locations.

6-G3.1.2

Explain the factors that cause different climate types.

6-G3.2.1

Locate major ecosystems and explain how and why they are similar or different as a consequence of latitude, elevation, land-forms, location, and human activity.

6-G4.1.1

Define culture and describe examples of cultural change through diffusion, including what has diffused, why and where it has spread, and positive and negative consequences of the change.

6-G4.1.2

Compare and contrast the gender roles assigned to men and women in different societies.

6-G4.1.3

Describe cultures of the region being studied, including the major languages and religions.

6-G4.1.4

Explain how culture influences the daily lives of people.

6-G4.2.1

Identify and describe the advantages, disadvantages, and impacts of different technologies used to transport people and products, and spread ideas throughout the world.

6-G4.3.1

Explain how people have modified the environment and used technology to make places more suitable for humans, as well as how modifications sometimes have negative/unintended consequences.

6-G4.3.2

Describe patterns of settlement and explain why people settle where they do and how people make their livings.

6-G4.3.3

Explain the patterns, causes, and consequences of major human migrations.

6-G4.4.1

Identify factors that contribute to cooperation and conflict between and among cultural groups (control/use of natural resources, power, wealth, and cultural diversity).

6-G4.4.2

Evaluate examples of cooperation and conflict within the region under study from different perspectives.

6-G5.1.1

Describe examples of how humans have impacted and are continuing to impact the environment in different places as a consequence of population size, resource use, level of consumption, and technology.

6-G5.1.2

Explain how different technologies can have positive and negative impacts on the environment.

6-G5.1.3

Analyze ways in which human-induced changes in the physical environment in one place can cause changes in other places.

6-G5.1.4

Define natural resources and explain how people in different places use, define, and acquire resources in different ways.

6-G5.2.1

Analyze the effects that a change in the physical environment could have on human activities and the actions people would be required to make (or would choose to make) in response to the change.

6-G5.2.2

Analyze how combinations of human decisions and natural forces can lead to (or help people avoid) a natural disaster.

6-G6.1.1

Identify global issues.

6-G6.1.2

Investigate a contemporary global issue by applying the skills of geographic inquiry.

6-G6.1.3

Develop a plan for action: • share and discuss findings of research and issue analysis in group discussions and debates. • compose a persuasive essay justifying a position with a reasoned argument. • develop an action plan to address or inform others about the issue, at local to global scales.

6-P3.1.1

"Integrate Michigan process and skills standards into a grade-appropriate project. Clearly state a global issue as a question of public policy, trace the origins of the issue, analyze various perspectives, and generate and evaluate alternative resolutions. Identify public policy issues related to global topics and issues studied. For example: • use Michigan social studies process and skills methods to acquire content knowledge

6-P4.2.1

Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views in matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

6-P4.2.2

Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving the local, national or global issues studied.

6-P4.2.3

Participate in projects to help or inform others.
7

7-G1.2.1

Use a variety of geographical tools (maps, globes, geographic information systems [GIS], and web-based geography technology) to analyze what is happening at different times in different locations.

7-G1.2.2

Apply the skills of geographic inquiry (asking geographic questions, acquiring geographic information, organizing geographic information, analyzing geographic information, and answering geographic questions) to analyze a geographic problem or issue.

7-G1.2.3

Use, interpret, and create maps and graphs representing places and regions in the era being studied.

7-G1.2.4

Locate and use information from maps and GIS to answer geographic questions on the era and region being studied.

7-G3.1.1

Investigations Designed for World History Eras 1-3 – conduct research on topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action.

7-G4.2.1

Identify and describe the advantages, disadvantages, and impacts of different technologies used to transport products and ideas in the era being studied.

7-G4.3.1

Explain how people in the past have modified the environment and used technology to make places more suitable for humans.

7-G4.3.2

Describe patterns of settlement and explain why people settled where they did.

7-G4.3.3

Explain the patterns, causes, and consequences of major human migrations.

7-G4.4.1

Identify factors that contribute to conflict and cooperation between and among cultural groups.

7-G4.4.2

Describe examples of cooperation and conflict in the era being studied.

7-G5.1.1

Describe examples of how humans modified the environment in the era being studied.

7-G5.1.2

Explain how different technologies were used in the era being studied.

7-G5.1.3

Explain how people defined and used natural resources in the era being studied.

7-H1.1.1

Compare and contrast several different calendar systems used in the past and present and their cultural significance.

7-H1.2.1

Explain how historians use a variety of sources to explore the past.

7-H1.2.2

Read and comprehend a historical passage to identify basic factual knowledge and the literal meaning by indicating who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to the development, and what consequences or outcomes followed.

7-H1.2.3

Identify the point of view (perspective of the author) and context when reading and discussing primary and secondary sources.

7-H1.2.4

Compare and evaluate differing historical perspectives based on evidence.

7-H1.2.5

Describe how historians use methods of inquiry to identify cause/effect relationships in history, nothing that many have multiple causes.

7-H1.2.6

Identify the role of the individual in history and the significance of one person's ideas.

7-H1.4.1

Describe and use cultural institutions to study an era and a region.

7-H1.4.2

Describe and use themes of history to study patterns of change and continuity.

7-H1.4.3

Use historical perspectives to analyze global issues faced by humans long ago and today.

7-P3.1.1

Clearly state an issue as a question of public policy in contemporary or historical context, or as a contemporary/historical comparison. Trace the origins of an issue, analyze and synthesize various perspectives, and generate and evaluate alternative resolutions. Deeply examine policy issues in group discussions and debates to make reasoned and informed decisions. Write persuasive/argumentative essays expressing and justifying decisions on public policy issues. Plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness:

  • identify public policy issues related to global topics and issues studied.
  • clearly state the issue as a question of public policy orally or in written form.
  • use inquiry methods to acquire content knowledge and appropriate data about the issue.
  • identify the causes and consequences and analyze the impact, both positive and negative.
  • share and discuss findings of research and issue analysis in group discussions and debates.
  • compose a persuasive essay justifying the position with a reasoned argument.
  • develop an action plan to address or inform others about the issue at the different scales. 

7-P4.2.1

Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views in matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

7-P4.2.2

Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national or international problem studied.

7-P4.2.3

Participate in projects to help or inform others.

7-W1.1.1

Explain how and when human communities populated major regions of the world and adapted to a variety of environments.

7-W1.1.2

Explain what archaeologists have learned about Paleolithic and Neolithic societies.

7-W1.2.1

Describe the transition of many cultures from hunter-gatherers to sedentary agriculture (domestication of plants and animals).

7-W1.2.2

Explain the importance of the natural environment in the development of agricultural settlements in different locations.

7-W1.2.3

Explain the impact of the first Agricultural Revolution (stable food supply, surplus, population growth, trade, division of labor, development of settlements, changes to the environment, and changes to hunter-gatherer societies.

7-W2.1.1

Describe the importance of the development of human communication (oral, visual, and written) and its relationship to the development of culture.

7-W2.1.2

Describe how the invention of agriculture led to the emergence of agrarian civilizations (seasonal harvests, specialized crops, cultivation, and development of villages and towns).

7-W2.1.3

Use historical and modern maps and other sources to locate, describe, and analyze major river systems and discuss the ways these physical settings supported permanent settlements and development of early civilizations.

7-W2.1.4

Examine early civilizations to describe their common features, including environment, economies, and social institutions.

7-W2.1.5

Define the concept of cultural diffusion and explain how ideas and technology spread from one region to another.

7-W2.1.6

Describe pastoralism and explain how the climate and geography of Central Asia were linked to the rise of pastoral societies on the steppes.

7-W3.1.1

Describe the characteristics that classical civilizations share.

7-W3.1.10

Create a timeline that illustrates the rise and fall of classical empires during the classical period.

7-W3.1.11

Explain the role of economics in shaping the development of classical civilizations and empires.

7-W3.1.2

Using historic and modern maps, locate three major empires of this era, describe their geographic characteristics including physical features and climates, and propose a generalization about the relationship between geographic characteristics and the development of early empires.

7-W3.1.3

Compare and contrast the defining characteristics of a city-state, civilization, and empire.

7-W3.1.4

Assess the importance of Greek ideas about democracy and citizenship in the development of Western political thought and institutions.

7-W3.1.5

Describe major achievements from Indian, Chinese, Mediterranean, African, Southwest and Central Asian, Mesoamerican, and Andean civilizations.

7-W3.1.6

Use historic and modern maps to locate and describe trade networks linking empires in the classical area.

7-W3.1.7

Use a case study to describe how trade integrated cultures and influenced in the economy within empires.

7-W3.1.8

Describe the role of state authority, military power, taxation systems, and institutions of coerced labor, including slavery, in building and maintaining empires.

7-W3.1.9

Describe the significance of legal codes, belief systems, written languages, and communications in the development of large regional empires.

7-W3.2.1

Identify and describe the core beliefs of major world religions and belief systems, including Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Sikhism and Islam.

7-W3.2.2

Locate the geographical center of major religions and map the spread through 1500 CE.

7-W4.1.1

Crisis in the Classical World – analyze the environmental, economic, and political crises in the classical world that led to the collapse of classical empires and the consolidation of Byzantium.

7-W4.1.2

Africa to 1500 CE – use a case study to describe how trade integrated cultures and influenced the economy within early African empires.

7-W4.1.3

North America to 1500 CE – use a case study to describe the culture and economy of Indigenous Peoples in North America prior to 1500.
8

8-F1.0.1

Describe the ideas, experiences, and interactions that influenced the colonists' decisions to declare independence by analyzing: • colonial ideas about government. • experiences with self-government.

8-F1.0.2

Using the Declaration of Independence, including the grievances at the end of the document, describe the role this document played in expressing: • colonists’ views of government. • their reasons for separating from Great Britain.

8-F1.0.3

"Describe the consequences of the American Revolution by analyzing and evaluating the relative influences of: • establishment of an independent republican government. • creation of the Articles of Confederation. • changing views on freedom and equality. • concerns over the distribution of power within government, between government

8-P3.1.1

Identify, research, analyze, discuss, and defend a position on a national public policy issue.

  • identify a national public policy issue.
  • clearly state the issue as a question of public policy orally or in written form.
  • use inquiry methods to trace the origins of the issue and to acquire data about the issue.
  • generate and evaluate alternative resolutions to the public issue and analyze various perspectives (causes, consequences, positive and negative impact) on the issue.
  • identify and apply Democratic Values or Constitutional Principles.
  • share and discuss findings of research and issue analysis in group discussions and debates.
  • compose a persuasive essay justifying the position with a reasoned argument. 
  • develop an action plan to address or inform others about the issue. 

8-P4.2.1

Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views in matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

8-P4.2.2

Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national or international problem studied.

8-P4.2.3

Participate in projects to help or inform others.

8-U3.3.1

Explain the reasons for the adoption and subsequent failure of the Articles of Confederation.

8-U3.3.2

Identify economic, political, and cultural issues facing the nation during the period of the Articles of Confederation and the opening of the Constitutional Convention.

8-U3.3.3

Describe the major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention, including the distribution of political power among the states and within the federal government, the conduct of foreign affairs, commerce with tribes, rights of individuals, the election of the executive, and the enslavement of Africans as a regional and federal issue.

8-U3.3.4

Explain how the new Constitution resolved (or compromised) the major issues, including sharing and separation of power and checking of power among federal government institutions; dual sovereignty (state-federal power); rights of individuals; the Electoral College; the Three-Fifths Compromise; the Great Compromise; and relationships and affairs with tribal nations.

8-U3.3.5

Analyze the debates over the ratification of the Constitution from the

8-U3.3.6

Explain how the Bill of Rights reflected the concept of limited government, protection of basic freedoms, and the fear among many Americans of a strong central government.

8-U3.3.7

Use important ideas and documents to describe the philosophical origins of constitutional government in the United States with an emphasis on the following ideals: social contract, limited government, natural rights, right of revolution, separation of powers, bicameralism, republicanism, and popular participation in government.

8-U4.1.1

Washington’s Farewell – use President George Washington’s farewell address to analyze Washington's perspective on the most significant challenges the new nation faced.

8-U4.1.2

Establishing America’s Place in the World – assess the changes in America's relationships with other nations by analyzing the origins, intents, and purposes of treaties.

8-U4.1.3

Challenge of Political Conflict – examine the origins and intentions of early American political parties, including how they emerged, who participated and what influenced their ideologies.

8-U4.1.4

Establishing a National Judiciary and its Power – use Marbury v. Madison to explain the development of the power of the Supreme Court through the doctrine of judicial review.

8-U4.2.1

"Comparing the Northeast and the South – compare and contrast the social and economic systems of the Northeast , the South, and the Western Frontier (Kentucky, Ohio Valley, etc.) with respect to geography, climate, and the development of: • agriculture, including changes in productivity, technology, supply and demand,

8-U4.2.2

The Institution of Slavery – explain the ideology of the institution of slavery, its policies, and consequences.

8-U4.2.3

Westward Expansion – analyze the annexation of the west through the Louisiana Purchase, the removal of Indigenous Peoples from their ancestral homelands, the Mexican-American War, the growth of a system of commercial agriculture, and the idea of Manifest Destiny.

8-U4.2.4

Consequences of Expansion – develop an argument based on evidence about the positive and negative consequences of territorial and economic expansion on Indigenous Peoples, efforts to maintain and sustain the institution of slavery, and the relations between free and slave-holding states.

8-U4.3.1

Explain the origins of the American education system.

8-U4.3.2

Describe the formation and development of the abolitionist movement by considering the roles of key abolitionist leaders and the response of southerners and northerners to the abolitionist movement.

8-U4.3.3

Analyze the antebellum women’s rights (and suffrage) movement by discussing the goals of its leaders and comparing primary source documents from this era to the Declaration of Independence.

8-U4.3.4

Analyze the goals and effects of the antebellum temperance movement.

8-U4.3.5

Investigate the role of religion in shaping antebellum reform movements.

8-U5.1.1

Compare the differences in the lives of free black people (including those who escaped from slavery) with the lives of free white people and enslaved people.

8-U5.1.2

Describe the impact of the Northwest Ordinance on the expansion of slavery.

8-U5.1.3

Describe the competing views of John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, and Henry Clay on the nature of the union among the states.

8-U5.1.4

Draw conclusions about why the following increased sectional tensions: • the Missouri Compromise (1820). • the Wilmot Proviso (1846). • the Compromise of 1850, including the Fugitive Slave Act. the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854) and subsequent conflict in Kansas. • the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857). • changes in the party system.

8-U5.1.5

Describe the resistance of enslaved persons and effects of their actions before and during the Civil War.

8-U5.1.6

Describe how major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention, such as disagreements over the distribution of political power, rights of individuals (liberty and property), rights of states, the election of the executive, and slavery, help explain the Civil War.

8-U5.2.1

Discuss the social, political, economic, and cultural reasons for secession.

8-U5.2.2

"Make an argument to explain the reasons why the North won the Civil War by considering the following: • critical events and battles in the war. • the political and military leadership of the North and South. • respective advantages and disadvantages of each side, including geographic,

8-U5.2.3

"Examine Abraham Lincoln’s presidency with respect to: • his military and political leadership. • the evolution of his emancipation policy (including the Emancipation

8-U5.2.4

Describe the role of African-Americans in the war, including black soldiers and regiments, and the increased resistance of enslaved people.

8-U5.2.5

Construct generalizations about how the war affected combatants, civilians (including the role of women and Indigenous Peoples), the physical environment, and the future of warfare, including technological developments.

8-U5.3.1

Compare the different positions concerning the reconstruction of Southern society and the nation, including the positions of President Abraham Lincoln, President Andrew Johnson, Republicans, Democrats, and African-Americans.

8-U5.3.2

Describe the early responses to the end of the Civil War by describing: • the policies of the Freedmen’s Bureau. • the restrictions placed on the rights and opportunities of freedmen, including racial segregation and Black Codes.

8-U5.3.3

Describe the new role of African-Americans in local, state, and federal government in the years after the Civil War and the national and regional resistance to this change, including the Ku Klux Klan.

8-U5.3.4

Analyze the intent and the effect of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution.

8-U5.3.5

Explain the decision to remove Union troops from the South in 1877 and investigate its impact on Americans.

8-U6.1.1

America at Century’s End – compare and contrast the United States in 1800 with the United States in 1898, focusing on similarities and differences in: • territory. • population. • systems of transportation. • governmental policies promoting economic development. • economic change. • the treatment of African-Americans. • the policies toward Indigenous Peoples.

8-U6.2.1

U.S. History Investigation Topic and Issue Analysis, Past and Present - use historical perspectives to analyze issues in the United States from the past and the present; conduct research on a historical issue or topic, identify a connection to a contemporary issue, and present findings (e.g., oral, visual, video, or electronic presentation, persuasive essay, or research paper); include causes and consequences of the historical action and predict possible consequences of the contemporary action.